Goldberg Victory Means New Majority-White Board Remains Without Any Parents of Kids in L.A. Schools

Goldberg Victory Means New Majority-White Board Remains Without Any Parents of Kids in L.A. Schools

With veteran politician Jackie Goldberg returning to the LAUSD Board to represent District 5 nearly 30 years after she left, a majority-Latino district will now be run by a majority-white Board that remains bereft of any parents of school-age children.

Goldberg defeated L.A. Unified parent Heather Repenning 72-28 percent with a paltry 7.7 percent voter turnout. Her victory signals an increase in the power of United Teachers Los Angeles in the wake of the January strike, which could complicate the efforts of Superintendent Austin Beutner to rein in district spending at a moment when the County is threatening to take over.

“This is not the end, this is the beginning,” Goldberg told her supporters after initial results came in Tuesday night.

Because this was a special election to fill the seat vacated by Board member Ref Rodriguez, who resigned last summer, Goldberg will only hold the position for about a year before another primary election is held next March. BD5 includes gentrifying neighborhoods of Los Feliz and Echo Park, as well as overwhelmingly Latino Southeast cities of Huntington Park, South Gate, Vernon and Cudahy.

The loss of a Latino representative in District 5 means four of seven LAUSD Board members are now white, despite the fact that 90 percent of L.A. Unified students are kids of color.

“Congratulations to Ms. Goldberg. We hope and trust that she will focus her attention on improving the outcomes for the kids in her district who are least well-served by their local schools,” said Speak UP Founder and CEO Katie Braude. “And we hope she is sincere when she says the families in the Southeast won’t be ignored.”

Goldberg’s victory also poses a potential threat to the future of charter schools in Los Angeles and the 20 percent of L.A. students served by them.

“The only reason I came out of retirement is that I can beat the people who are running the charter candidates,” Goldberg, who also served on the City Council and in the state Assembly, said early in her campaign. The California Charter Schools Association, which has been a main funder in previous school board races, chose not to fight Goldberg or endorse any candidate in the primary or the runoff.

Instead, the race shaped up to be a battle between two unions: UTLA, and SEIU Local 99, the union representing bus drivers, janitors, special education aides and cafeteria workers, which backed Repenning, a former deputy and close ally to Mayor Eric Garcetti.

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District 5 Special Election Tuesday Could Shift Direction Of LAUSD Board

District 5 Special Election Tuesday Could Shift Direction Of LAUSD Board

Voters head to the polls Tuesday for a special election in LAUSD’s Board District 5, which has been without representation since last summer, when Ref Rodriguez resigned. The runoff between candidates Heather Repenning and Jackie Goldberg could mark a significant shift in the direction of the board.  

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Final BD5 Vote Tally: Heather Repenning Will Face Jackie Goldberg In May 14 Runoff

Final BD5 Vote Tally: Heather Repenning Will Face Jackie Goldberg In May 14 Runoff

The final vote count released Thursday confirms that parent Heather Repenning will face Jackie Goldberg in a May 14 runoff for the LAUSD Board District 5 seat. The vote will be certified Friday. Graciela Ortiz, in third place by just 31 votes, can still demand a recount but would have to pay for it. She has made no public statement since the results were released, but there's no sign so far that she will ask for a recount.

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LAUSD Parent Heather Repenning Declares Victory In Race For BD5 Runoff Spot

LAUSD Parent Heather Repenning Declares Victory In Race For BD5 Runoff Spot

SEIU-backed candidate Heather Repenning has declared victory in the race for a runoff spot against Jackie Goldberg in the May 14 LAUSD BD5 special election. If Repenning wins, she will be the only parent of a current LAUSD student on the Board of Education.

After all valid ballots were counted Friday, Repenning led third-place candidate Graciela Ortiz by just 31 votes.  “I look forward to a spirited campaign in the coming weeks that centers on how we can best bring a new chapter of change to LAUSD as we sprint to the May 14 runoff election,” Repenning said in a statement Friday after thanking all the voters, her supporters and the other candidates.

It's unclear whether Ortiz will concede or ask for a recount after the vote is certified March 22. “At work. Can’t talk,” Ortiz texted Speak UP when asked to comment. Anyone willing to pay for it can request a machine or manual recount within the five days after the vote is certified. There is no automatic recount, regardless of the margin.

The tight race for a second-place runoff spot certainly went down to the wire. Repenning had landed in third place on election night but later pulled ahead after more mail-in ballots arrived. Her lead narrowed, however, every time a new batch of votes was counted.

“These results show how critical every last vote is, and how important your support has been,” Reppening posted on Facebook and Twitter March 12.

Voters that submitted ballots that were missing valid signatures still have an opportunity to send in corrected ballots by Wednesday, but voters rarely respond to that opportunity so Friday’s vote tally was considered all but final. “There are no remaining ballots to be counted,” said a spokesman for the Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder’s office.

The race between Repenning and Goldberg means that two white, union-backed political insiders from the northern part of the district will face off in a district that was specifically drawn to maximize Latino representation. Ortiz, a Councilmember from Huntington Park, as well as a high school attendance counselor and UTLA member, had strong grassroots support from many parents and voters in the primarily Latino Southeast portion of BD5.

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Graciela Ortiz Appears Headed For a Runoff With Jackie Goldberg, Setting Up a Battle Over Generations, Geography And Race

Graciela Ortiz Appears Headed For a Runoff With Jackie Goldberg, Setting Up a Battle Over Generations, Geography And Race

Boosted in part by Speak UP’s efforts to turn out the vote in the primarily Latino Southeast section of LAUSD’s Board District 5, Huntington Park Councilmember and school counselor Graciela Ortiz appears to be headed for a runoff against veteran politician Jackie Goldberg, who last served on the school board in the ‘80s and early ‘90s.

Goldberg, 74, who was backed by United Teachers Los Angeles and received $640,000 in outside union spending to support her campaign, rode the wave of the teachers strike to take a solid lead with 48.26 percent of the vote. Nevertheless, she fell short of the more than 50 percent needed to win outright and avoid a runoff May 14.

Ortiz led candidate Heather Repenning for the second-place spot by just 53 votes after all the results were tallied on election night. With provisional and late-arriving mail-in ballots still uncounted, results could still change. Principal Cynthia Gonzalez took fourth place, and parent/educator Allison Bajracharya took fifth.

Repenning, who received backing and nearly $1 million in support from SEIU Local 99, the union representing LAUSD bus drivers, cafeteria workers and special education aides, is not conceding the race for second place. There’s also still a slim chance Goldberg could win outright and avoid a runoff.

If Ortiz, 38, holds onto the second place spot, the runoff will present a stark generational, geographic and racial contrast. Ortiz, who works as an attendance counselor at Linda Marquez High School, has strong roots in the primarily Latino Southeast.

Grassroots support helped her overcome a massive spending disadvantage. While Ortiz raised more money than any other Latino candidate, $129,000, she was the fourth place fundraiser overall and had far less spent on her behalf ($90,558) than Goldberg ($640,913), Repenning ($765,704) or Bajracharya ($138,695). SEIU also poured almost $37,000 into negative ads opposing Ortiz.

Speak UP parent leaders, working in coalition with Parent Revolution and Families and Teachers United, clearly had an impact on the results. While none endorsed a candidate, all three focused efforts on informing voters in the Southeast cities of Huntington Park, South Gate, Vernon, Bell, Maywood and Cudahy about the election and encouraging them to vote.

After knocking on more than 22,000 doors and making more than 21,000 phone calls to voters, Speak UP and its coalition partners received pledges to participate in the election from nearly 4,500 voters. Ortiz leads the race for a second-place runoff spot with just 3,368 votes. 

“Speak UP parent leaders worked hard to get the word out to their neighbors that this was an important opportunity for their community to have a voice,” said Speak UP Executive Director Katie Braude. “They wanted to make their voices heard, and they did.”

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Speak UP Parent Leaders Get Out The Vote In Southeast District 5 School Board Election Tuesday

Speak UP Parent Leaders Get Out The Vote In Southeast District 5 School Board Election Tuesday

Speak UP parent activists in the southeast of LAUSD District 5 have been hitting the streets for the past seven weeks to boost voter turnout in the historically under-represented and primarily Latino communities of Huntington Park, Vernon, Bell, South Gate, Maywood and Cudahy.

Ten candidates are in the running for the District 5 seat, which has been vacant since Ref Rodriguez resigned last July. If no candidate receives more than 50 percent of the vote Tuesday, the race will move to a runoff on May 14.  

While 90 percent of the more than 81,000 LAUSD students in District 5 are Latino, most of the voters have traditionally come from the whiter and more affluent communities in the northern part of the district, including Silver Lake, Echo Park, Los Feliz, Mount Washington, Highland Park and Eagle Rock.

Speak UP has not endorsed a candidate in the March 5 primary, but Speak UP community leaders have been knocking on doors and calling voters in the Southeast to make them aware of the election and to encourage them to get out and vote.  

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Repenning, Bajracharya, Ortiz Claim Top Three Fundraising Spots In LAUSD Board District 5 Race

Repenning, Bajracharya, Ortiz Claim Top Three Fundraising Spots In LAUSD Board District 5 Race

With just a month to go until the LAUSD Board District 5 special election, candidate Heather Repenning leads in fundraising. Her campaign has taken in $197,248 according to the Los Angeles City Ethics Comission website. Allison Bajracharya is close behind with $151,372 and Graciela Ortiz is in third among ten candidates, with $114,315. 

Jackie Goldberg is in fourth place, with $77,951. However, a PAC funded by the teachers union has spent $171,000 backing her. Service Employees International Union Local 99, the union of 30,000 teacher assistants, bus drivers and other school support staff, has spent nearly $429,000 to get Repenning elected.

 Other candidates in the race are Ana Cubas, who has brought in $49,169, Cynthia Gonzalez with $24,615, David Valdez at $19,283, Salvador “Chamba” Sanchez at $6,999, Nestor Enrique Valencia at $2,644, and Rocio Rivas who, as of the most recent reporting deadline (January 19), had not reported any funds raised.

These figures pale in comparison to the 2017 LAUSD board elections, when nearly $10 million was spent in the Board District 4 race and $5 million in the Board District 6 race. Independent expenditures by UTLA and the California Charter Schools Association accounted for most of that. CCSA is not endorsing a candidate in the BD5 primary and has not spent any money backing or opposing any candidates.

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LAUSD BD5 Candidate Heather Repenning: 'I Think 100 Percent, Parents Should Have A Seat At The Table'

LAUSD BD5 Candidate Heather Repenning: 'I Think 100 Percent, Parents Should Have A Seat At The Table'

Speak UP: Tell us about yourself and why you are running for school board.

Heather Repenning: Public education is very important to me. I'm a product of public schools. Growing up, my mom was a public school teacher, and because of her understanding of public education, she was able to identify great schools for my brother and I, and I was able to go to college and do a lot more professionally than I would have done under other circumstances. My family comes from a humble background. Originally we’re from Kentucky. To me, public education is the doorway. It is how we allow our young people to pull themselves ahead to do the things that they never imagined. And I don't think that we're doing that particularly well right now. I don't think there's any one thing or person to blame, but the issues around how we create great neighborhood public schools are very complex and require a lot of hard work. Personally, I've worked in local government for many years, and I know the work it takes to move bureaucracy, create policy and build coalitions to move great policy forward. So I feel like I have the skills to do that. Because education is so important to me, I've worked [in education] at different points in my career. I was in the classroom for a few years right out of college, and I worked at LAUSD helping organize parents and other stakeholders around the process of building new schools. I worked on the previous Ambassador Hotel, now the RFK schools site, and advocating for the new schools that are now thriving on that site.

Speak UP: You taught early in your career. Was this in Honduras? Is that how you became fluent in Spanish?

Heather: Yes, I spent time teaching in Honduras, in a bilingual school, and then I moved to Southern California to pursue graduate school. Actually, I was on the pathway to becoming an academic. I was in a PhD program. At the time I was teaching composition to undergrads at UC Irvine. And I also previously taught an ESL class at LA City College.

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BD Candidate, Principal Cynthia Gonzalez: ‘People Have To See Kids Of Color As Important To Invest In’

BD Candidate, Principal Cynthia Gonzalez: ‘People Have To See Kids Of Color As Important To Invest In’

Speak UP: Tell us who you are, why you are running for School Board in District 5.

Cynthia Gonzalez: I am a high school principal. I've been with the district for 17 years as a classroom teacher, a coordinator focused on English learners, [and] an administrator now for nine years. I worked at all different types of schools so I have experience in the variety of different systems and how they impact kids. That has influenced my decision to run because I see which systems are the most effective for students, but also which systems are working against kids and how our work is more difficult when those systems aren't aligned and create inequity, both within the district and competing forces outside of the district, like charter schools. Having that understanding and the educational background and the fact that my own two daughters are in District 5 schools, and I'm a product of District 5 schools, who better than someone like me to be on the Board.

Speak UP: When you talk about the schools that work for kids and those that don't, what do you see as working for kids and not working for them?

Cynthia: I'm passionate about making sure that all schools are for all students. I have used parent choice myself, but usually when those schools [of choice] are outperforming, if you look at their data, they're not really servicing the same kids. That happens both within the district and with the charter school system. When I was at a magnet school, we didn’t offer ELD [English Language Development] so you don't have the newcomers that you’re servicing. That impacts your data dramatically. You're not servicing moderate to severe students with special needs. An effective system is a system where you can see all of those kids in that school, and all of those kids are thriving. I don't think we are there yet, but we have pilot schools in the district that service all students and carry all those programs that are doing better than the comparable local district schools, and a lot of it is giving the school site more local autonomy to be able to make decisions. That's a lot of trusting teachers and being able to provide them the resources needed. 

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Justine Gonzalez, First Transgender Candidate To Run For Office In L.A., Pulls Out Of Race

Justine Gonzalez, First Transgender Candidate To Run For Office In L.A., Pulls Out Of Race

Speak UP: Tell us who you are and why you decided to run for school board.

Justine: My name is Justine Gonzalez. I'm an LAUSD graduate and a new parent in LAUSD. [My daughter] just started pre-K at an LAUSD early education center [in Echo Park.] We’re looking at options for next year for kindergarten. I want what's best for my child, and it's a difficult decision. [My neighborhood school’s] performance is not great. One out of every four of the students in that school are meeting or exceeding math and English standards. That's very concerning. I've lived in the neighborhood across from that school for just over five years now. My block has plenty of families who have gone to both [our neighborhood school] and Gabriella charter.

SU: So you’re applying to Gabriella. Anywhere else?

Justine: I am. I’m a little bit behind in that process. It's like I needed to be on waitlists already. It’s disappointing because it's sort of that shared experience that so many parents have. Can’t it just be simple? Can't my child just [go across the street to the neighborhood school.] It's convenient and perfect, and it should be quality. But I have one neighbor. It took her three years in a row to get her daughter into Gabriella entering the lottery, and it's been a life-changing experience for her daughter in terms of education and her daughter's enjoyment of going to school. I think that's important. Listening to family stories.  

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Ten Candidates, Including Five Parents, Remain in the Running For LAUSD Board District 5 Seat

Ten Candidates, Including Five Parents, Remain in the Running For LAUSD Board District 5 Seat

Ten candidates, including four parents who filed to enter the LAUSD Board District 5 race, remain in the running after filing required signatures Wednesday.

Candidates Erika Alvarez and Justine Gonzalez dropped out of the race on Monday before the city clerk had finished verifying their signatures. Another candidate who had qualified for the ballot, Eduardo Cisneros, dropped out Friday after the labor union SEIU, his former employer, backed another candidate, Heather Repenning, who is also supported by Mayor Eric Garcetti.

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LAUSD BD 5 Candidate Ana Cubas: ‘My Teachers Have Been My Saving Grace.’

LAUSD BD 5 Candidate Ana Cubas: ‘My Teachers Have Been My Saving Grace.’

Speak UP: Tell us about yourself and why you're running for school board.

Ana: For me, education has been a way out of poverty and a way to empower myself, my family, my community. I'm the first in my family to go to college. My story is like many stories in L.A. and in our country. The American dream. I came when I was 10 from El Salvador. So it breaks my heart to see the caravan because we were actually caught at the border, and we were at a detention center for three weeks. Back then, they didn't separate families so we were together, but still in a detention center. That really affected me. I knew that I had to, even as a young girl --10, for goodness' sake, a child -- fight for my rights because I often had to speak up on behalf of my family about things. Now, because I had amazing teachers, I learned English very quickly. I had a dual immersion program. 

SU: Were you in an LAUSD school? 

Ana: I ended up at a Santa Monica public school because my uncle was there, and me and my mom and my dad and my sister moved in with him in a one-bedroom apartment in the Pico neighborhood. I had an amazing teacher in my combined 5th and 6th grade class. And in high school, I had a government teacher, Mr. Cady, who went to Berkeley in the '60s. Very hippie, liberal, so the class was about social justice. And he said to me one day, "Ana, you're bright. You need to go to college. I want you to apply to Berkeley." I had never heard of Berkeley, but because of him, I applied. I got in, and I graduated with highest honors. My teachers have been my saving grace. And school for me was a safe haven from the gang activity in my neighborhood, from the dysfunction of my family and the poverty. In a nutshell, that's who I am, and why I'm running. I'm an immigrant, the first in my family to go to college. I know what works because I know what worked for me. Engaged great teachers.  

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BD5 Candidate Graciela Ortiz: 'Many Times, We Are Unfair To Teachers'

 BD5 Candidate Graciela Ortiz: 'Many Times, We Are Unfair To Teachers'

Speak UP: Tell us who you are and why you are running for school board. 

Graciela Ortiz: I was born and raised in the beautiful city of Huntington Park, and I went to all local schools, graduated from Huntington Park High School in '99. Went off to UCLA. Got my Bachelor's Degree in sociology and a Master's Degree in social work from Cal State Long Beach. I was fortunate enough to get hired with LA Unified. Been working with them for 12 years. I just started my 13th school year as a Pupil Services and Attendance (PSA) counselor. I’m at Linda Marquez High School. I started my career in the South Bay area, became a lead PSA counselor in the district office supporting other school-based counselors, but it was too political for me. So I asked for a transfer to be with the kids. For me, it's about being one-on-one, being able to make those changes. I was fortunate enough to get a school right where I live, to be able to do what I love within my own community.

SU: What do you do as counselor?  

Graciela: I break down every possible barrier that keeps a child from going to school. Crisis intervention, counseling, basic needs resources. Going to the home and doing a bio-psycho-social assessment. It's about incentives [to attend school], reinforcing progress, not perfection.

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Parent, Educator Allison Bajracharya: ‘I absolutely think it's possible to serve all kids’

Parent, Educator Allison Bajracharya: ‘I absolutely think it's possible to serve all kids’

This lightly edited interview is the first in a series of Q&As with some of the candidates running for the LAUSD Board in District 5 on March 5.  

Speak UP: Tell us about your background and why you're running for school board.

Allison Bajracharya: I grew up in Kansas City, Missouri. I'm Jewish, and my parents grew up in Kansas City and faced a lot of anti-Semitism. That experience instilled the concepts of social justice and working with people who might not be in our immediate community. There are so many decisions made in our world today that are leaving so many people powerless. And it feels especially true in public education, when we're saying to a certain family, “you can only go to this school, and we're sorry that that school only has 4 percent proficiency, but that's your neighborhood school." Or "we're sorry you had a long-term sub for three years, but that's the best we can do." And it's true with our federal administration when they're making decisions or claims that suggest that certain people should be treated as second-class citizens. I absolutely disagree.

I've worked really hard to think about how to bring power to communities, and I really think education is the No. 1 opportunity. I've worked in education for the last 18 years, starting as a high school teacher and then pursuing a Masters in Public Policy because I recognized that what was happening in my classroom where I taught was really the result of a system-level failure. So I thought if I go and get my Masters in Public Policy I could look at how to influence education at a systems level. I’ve worn a lot of different hats for the last 18 years, starting as a teacher but then working at the district with Marlene Canter, who was [LAUSD] school board President. I was her Director of Community Affairs.

SU: You're also a parent in the district now. How many kids do you have and where are they in school?

Allison: I have two kids, definitely the greatest source of pride for me. My daughter, Miri, is 9 years old, and she's in 4th grade and my son, Leo, is 7, and he's in 2nd. They attend Franklin Avenue Elementary, which is our neighborhood school in Los Feliz. We’ve had amazing teachers every year, which in any school is pretty unusual. The community is a very rich part of the school. The fact that we get to walk to school is so unusual in L.A.  

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Marshall Tuck Concedes To Tony Thurmond In Race for State Superintendent of Public Instruction

Marshall Tuck Concedes To Tony Thurmond In Race for State Superintendent of Public Instruction

Marshall Tuck conceded his race for state superintendent of public instruction to opponent Tony Thurmond on Saturday, saying, “I am disappointed because I believe I could have made a real difference for our kids.”

Early results looked good for Tuck, an education reform Democrat who ran Green Dot Public Schools and the Partnership For Los Angeles Schools. The day after the Nov. 6 election, the Los Angeles resident, whose child attends an LAUSD elementary school, led 50.7 percent to 49.3 percent.  But as more ballots were tallied in what was the most expensive state superintendent race not just in California in history, but nationwide, Thurmond pulled ahead. And though Thurmond’s lead is than less 2 percent, and many ballots remained uncounted Saturday, the outstanding ballots were in counties Thurmond won handily, including Los Angeles.

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Transgender Activist Among Many Parents Vying For District 5 Board Seat

Transgender Activist Among Many Parents Vying For District 5 Board Seat

While there are currently no parents of school-age children serving on the LAUSD Board, at least seven of the 17 candidates who have filed to run in the District 5 special election on March 5 are parents, and most have included that fact in their ballot designations. One parent, Justine Gonzalez, would be the first transgender person elected to office in Los Angeles if she were to win.  

The BD5 seat has been empty since the resignation of Board Member Ref Rodriguez earlier this year. Former BD5 Board Member Bennett Kayser, whom Rodriguez defeated in the last race for the seat, has decided to run again, as has Jackie Goldberg, another former Board member and state lawmaker who failed in her attempt to get appointed to the seat after parents objected to a closed process that excluded their input.

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Strange Bedfellows: Prison Officers’ Union Bankrolls Schools Chief Candidate Tony Thurmond

  Strange Bedfellows: Prison Officers’ Union Bankrolls Schools Chief Candidate Tony Thurmond

Why would the state prison officers’ union invest significantly in the state schools chief race?

The group has no history of doing so in the past. Nevertheless, the California Correctional Peace Officers Association has endorsed State Superintendent of Public Instruction candidate Tony Thurmond and committed $500,000 for TV ads supporting his race against Marshall Tuck. 

Thurmond, currently an assemblyman representing Richmond in Northern California, has been very good to the prison guard union. Earlier this year, he voted to approve the officers’ latest contract, which included a 5 percent wage increase at a two-year cost of nearly $340 million.

That means wages for union members have increased 67 percent since 2001. Meanwhile, Los Angeles teachers are threatening to strike because state funding for schools has LAUSD on the verge of insolvency, with class sizes that nearly everyone believes are too large.

The prison guard cash infusion has critics calling into question the “EDUCATE NOT INCARCERATE” claim on his District 15 website. California spends about five times as much per prisoner as per student, so perhaps the prison guard union wants to make sure the next state superintendent doesn’t challenge that status quo.

Tuck, who formerly ran the Partnership For Los Angeles Schools and is a parent of a child attending his local LAUSD school, has highlighted the discrepancy in funding for prisoners versus pupils in ads that began airing several weeks ago.

“Did you know that every year California spends $71,000 per prisoner but only $16,000 per student?” one ad opens. “It's no wonder our public schools rank 44th in the nation.”

News of the half million for Thurmond came shortly after those ads began airing.

“It’s ironic,” Tuck told CALmatters, “that Thurmond talks about moving money from prison to schools but has made votes to increase spending for prisons.”

Speak UP has not endorsed a candidate in the race for state superintendent, however, our organization strongly supports more state funding for education. And in the competition for dollars, we adopt the “schools not prisons” mantra.

“State economies would be much stronger over time if states invested more in education and other areas that can boost long-term economic growth and less in maintaining extremely high prison populations,” wrote Michael Mitchell, a senior policy analyst at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Directing more money to schools might actually diminish the need for so much spending on prisons. Increasing high school graduation rates, reduces crime rates and the costs of incarceration, according to a report from the Alliance for Excellent Education.

It’s shocking that such a progressive state as California would spend so much more per prisoner than per student. The power of the prison guard union may explain why. LAUSD Board Member Richard Vladovic ranted about the fact that the state won’t respond to a UTLA strike by giving schools more funding because “They gotta pay for prisons first,” he said. “They’re not gonna pay for children.”

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Tuck Leads Thurmond In State Supe Race, Villaraigosa Concedes To Newsom, Cox For Governor

Tuck Leads Thurmond In State Supe Race, Villaraigosa Concedes To Newsom, Cox For Governor

Education reformer Marshall Tuck and union-backed candidate Tony Thurmond will face off in the fall in the race for State Superintendent of Public Instruction, while ed reform Democrat Antonio Villaraigosa placed third and was eliminated in the governor’s race, which will now be between Democrat Gavin Newsom and Republican John Cox in November. Tuck, an education reformer who led Los Angeles school turnaround efforts, was ahead with 37 percent to Thurmond’s 34 percent, with 97 percent of precincts reporting, according to LA School Report. Meanwhile, Villaraigosa conceded his race just before 11 p.m. Read more here.

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EdSource Hosts Live Q&A With State Superintendent Candidates May 23

EdSource Hosts Live Q&A With State Superintendent Candidates May 23

EdSource is hosting an online conversation with Marshall Tuck and Tony Thurmond, leading candidates for state superintendent of public instruction on May 23 at 9:30 a.m. To view and participate click on this page at that time. 

EdSource’s John Fensterwald and Louis Freedberg will ask about their positions on critical issues and their visions for California’s public schools. The state superintendent leads the California Department of Education, which oversees the state’s nearly 1,000 school districts and more than 10,000 public schools.

The two candidates will answer questions on how they plan to raise student achievement and guide California’s schools in the era of local control. Email EdSource with your questions for the candidates at spatel@edsource.org.

The broadcast will go live May 23 at 9:30 am. The primary election is June 5.

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